FAO today marked International Tea Day by stressing the crucial need to ensure the sustainability of tea production - a basis for the livelihoods of millions of farmers - especially at a time when the world economy enters a recession and incomes decline as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.
By cherishing bees and other pollinators, not only do we safeguard the environment and create a sustainable ecosystem, but also support the livelihoods of rural and indigenous peoples which is particularly critical in extraordinary times like the current COVID -19 pandemic.
By cherishing bees and other pollinators, not only do we safeguard the environment and create a sustainable ecosystem, but also support the livelihoods of rural and indigenous peoples which is particularly critical in extraordinary times like the current COVID -19 pandemic.

14:30 (Geneva time - GMT+2).

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Covid-19 Crisis: Global Crisis, Global Risk and Global Consequences is a new webinar series that examines various possible and visible consequences of the current crisis including its strategic and economic implications, impact on global governance, on gender or the role of technology.

The webinar is free and conducted in English. The first webinar session will provide an overview of the strategic, global health security, crisis management, governance, economic and financial implications of this crisis.

The COVID-19 pandemic has changed everything. In just three months it has spread globally, infected nearly 5 million people, and put half the world in lock-down. With supply chains disrupted, and even multi-national businesses threatened, the economic slowdown has delivered a deeper, more rapid shock than the 2008 global financial crisis. And the accompanying socio-economic impact on health, wellbeing and livelihoods threatens to derail the global compact to “leave no-one behind” that underpins Agenda 2030 and the SDGs.

This pandemic has hit the most vulnerable and unequal societies the hardest. The differential impacts of the health crisis and lockdown have exacerbated pre-existing inequalities - widening the gap between the haves and the have-nots and wiping out decades of progress on poverty eradication. These impacts will last into future generations – through sharp rises in malnutrition and stunting; permanent loss of educational opportunities for children who cannot connect from home; and the toll of death and morbidity among the – usually female and low-paid - health and care workforce who form our first line of defence against the disease.

The crisis has clearly demonstrated that all societies are interconnected and deeply interdependent. These factors drove the global solidarity behind Agenda 2030 and the SDGs that drew support from 193 global leaders at the UN sustainable development summit in 2015. And this compact to build a sustainable future for people, planet, prosperity and peace is the only legitimate, universal and internationally recognised vision for humanity we have. But as poorer countries and vulnerable communities fall further off-track, while richer countries reallocate resources to deal with the immediate impacts of the pandemic, how can we reboot and reshape our efforts to reach the SDGs? What actions must we take to “build back better”?

This webinar will feature presentations on how the direct and indirect impacts of the COVID-19 crisis have affected and are affected by social and economic inequalities, and the likely impacts on the achievement of the SDGs. Focusing on the latest evidence from nutrition; education; women, children and adolescent’s health and gender equality, the panel will make recommendations for urgent action to stem growing inequality and “leave no-one behind” – and will set out their prescriptions for a sustainable, fair and secure post-COVID world.

19 May 2020 10:00 AM in Eastern Time (US and Canada)

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Join the high-level congressional webinar briefing co-hosted by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the Alliance to End Hunger in conjunction with the House and Senate Hunger Caucuses to learn about the key findings of the 2020 Global Report on Food Crises and opportunities to prevent an unprecedented hunger catastrophe.

Featured Speakers

QU Dongyu, Director-General, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)
Johan Swinnen, Director-General, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)
Senator Richard Durbin (D-IL) and Co-Chair of the Senate Hunger Caucus
Congressman James McGovern (MA-02) and Co-Chair of the House Hunger Caucus
Amb. Tony Hall, Executive Director Emeritus, Alliance to End Hunger
Dominique Burgeon, Director, Emergency and Rehabilitation Division, FAO

Tuesday 19 March 2020, 2pm London

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To tease out the GNR's food system threads, the SDG2 Advocacy Hub will, on 19 May, host a dialogue on what the GNR tells us about indicators for inclusive food systems. Gathering voices from across climate, agriculture, nutrition and food, the confirmed panellists include Agnes Kalibata, Gunhild Stordalen, Chef Sam Kass and Theo de Jager with a short brief on this year's report from Professor Vankatesh Mannar.

The UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) is seeking $350 million to scale up hunger-fighting and livelihoods-boosting activities in food crisis contexts where COVID-19’s impact could be devastating.

For the first time since the launch of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in 2015, UN and multilateral agencies from across health, education, agriculture, WASH, and social welfare sectors have come together to make a renewed commitment to school health and nutrition. The partnership, Stepping up effective school health and nutrition aims to advance the health and nutrition of school-aged children and adolescents, so they are ready to learn and thrive, and can contribute meaningfully to the future of their communities and countries.

The joint call for action comes as the COVID-19 pandemic pushes 90% of the world’s student population out of school and brings to light the important role schools play in protecting the health and well-being of learners. Millions of children are now missing the one nutritious meal a day they received through school feeding programmes. Millions more can no longer access the basic health services and critical health education provided in schools across the world.

Through united action, the partnership, which includes FAO, GPE, UNESCO, UNICEF, UNSCN, the World Bank, WFP, and WHO, invites governments and other partners to join them in renewing their own commitments to school health and nutrition and to increase and better align investments and efforts to  bring proven interventions to scale and respond to children’s learning and growth needs holistically, and ultimately build the human capital of countries.

Friday 15 May at 15:00 CEST
Register here: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/8729481715829403919

FAOUNEPICLEI, RUAF and Rikolto invite you to learn from the experience of 3 cities: New York City (USA), Kampala (Uganda) and Quito (Ecuador) in a webinar on Cities and Covid-19: Food access for vulnerable communities on Friday 15 May at 15:00 CEST.

Speakers:

  • Jamie Morrison, Strategic Programme Leader, Food Systems Programme, FAO
  • Kate MacKenzie, Director of the Mayor's Office of Food Policy, New York City
  • Esau Galukande, Deputy Director Production and Marketing, Kampala Capital City Authority
  • David Jácome Polit, Metropolitan Director of Resilience, Municipality of Quito

The webinar is part of a Series of webinars on the Food Systems Approach in Practice promoted by members of the One Planet Network Sustainable Food Systems Programme (SFS Programme), a global multi-stakeholder platform to support countries in the transition towards sustainable food systems.

The 2020 Global Nutrition Report looks beyond global and national patterns, revealing significant inequalities in nutrition outcomes within countries and populations. Based on the best-available data, in-depth analysis and expert opinion rooted in evidence, the report identifies critical actions to achieve nutrition equity. Everyone deserves access to healthy, affordable food and quality nutrition care.

 

Executive Summary

Download the Report here