Entries by UNSCN Secretariat

Call for experts for the FAO/WHO Joint Expert Meetings on Nutrition (JEMNU) on nitrogen to protein conversion factors for soy- and milk-based ingredients used in infant formulas and follow-up formulas

The Joint FAO/WHO Expert Meetings on Nutrition (JEMNU) was established in 2012 to provide scientific advice to the committees of the Joint FAO/WHO Food Standards Programme (i.e. Codex Alimentarius) or Member Countries. JEMNU aims to provide relevant scientific advice in an independent and cost-effective manner; therefore, the Meetings will be convened when there is a specific request from a Codex Committee or Member Countries.

Currently being discussed at the Codex Committee on Nutrition and Foods for Special Dietary Uses (CCNFSDU) is the most appropriate nitrogen to protein conversion factor (or factors) to use in estimating protein content of soy-based ingredients and milk-based ingredients used in infant formulas and follow-up formulas. To provide guidance on this topic, at the 39th Session of CCNFSDU in 2017, the Committee requested that JEMNU be convened to review the evidence and develop evidence-informed guidance regarding nitrogen to protein conversion factors. (To facilitate the work of JEMNU, a systematic review is currently being conducted to compile and analyse the available data on nitrogen to protein conversion factors for foods containing soy-based and/or milk-based ingredients.)

FAO and WHO have therefore initiated the convening of JEMNU and are in the process of identifying experts with relevant knowledge and experiences to participate in the expert meeting to be held during 15 – 19 July 2019 (exact dates to be confirmed). The selected experts will review the evidence to establish appropriate nitrogen to protein conversion factors for soy-based and milk-based ingredients used in infant formulas and follow-up formulas.

For more information please visit: https://www.who.int/nutrition/topics/callforexperts-JEMNU-Feb2019/en/ or http://www.fao.org/nutrition/requirements/proteins/en/.

Applications must be received by 1 March 2019.

Promoting youth and women engagement and employment in food systems across the rural-urban continuum

04 Feb 2019, 09:30 – 17:00 (CET)
FAO HQ, Green Room
Rome, Italy

Over the next 15 years, it is estimated that about 1.6 billion people will reach working age in low and middle-income countries. How can food systems and enhanced rural-urban linkages provide more and better jobs for women and youth? What are the key driving factors and enabling conditions for food systems and enhanced rural-urban linkages to create employment and decent work? What is the role of small cities and rural towns in promoting women and youth employment in the food systems? And what is their role in linking producers to diverse and more equitable markets? 

Inclusion of youth and women in food system labour market will be paramount to achieving food security and nutrition for all.

Following the first intersessional event on The Food Security and Nutritional Impacts of Urbanization and Rural Transformation on Lower Income Groups, through an interactive format, this event will focus on policy approaches that support employment opportunities, improved livelihoods and adequate working conditions for youth and women, across food systems and across the rural-urban continuum. 

Besides furthering CFS stakeholders’ understanding of the interplay between food security, nutrition and rural-urban linkages, the intersessional events organized under the workstream Urbanization and Rural transformation and implications for Food Security and Nutrition are also expected to facilitate a functional and effective link with the CFS Multi-Year Programme of Work planning process.

 

Interpretation services will be provided in all UN official languages.

The webcast can be followed on http://www.fao.org/webcast

The event will build on the findings of the following CFS documents: 

Investing in Breastfeeding in 2019

On 30 and 31 January 2019 join a Global Breastfeeding Collective Webinar in Support of the Scaling Up Nutrition (SUN) Movement to be held in English, French and Spanish.

Breastfeeding benefits everyone. Breastfeeding acts as a baby’s first vaccine, providing antibodies that give babies everywhere a critical boost. It promotes cognitive development in children, which leads to higher educational achievement and greater earnings in adulthood. Breastfeeding reduces the burden of childhood illnesses such as diarrhea and pneumonia—two of the leading causes of deaths in children under age 5 globally — lowering health care costs and creating healthier families. Breastfeeding is also important for mothers, protecting and improving their health.

Many SUN member countries have made considerable progress to protect, promote and support breastfeeding, but more needs to be done. Organised by the SUN Movement Secretariat and the Global Breastfeeding Collective, this webinar will:

  1. Introduce tools to support advocacy efforts in SUN member countries.
  2. Inform SUN Government Focal Points and members of multi-stakeholder platforms about the work of the Global Breastfeeding Collective, its Call to Action and tools to support advocacy. 
  3. Share country experiences of successful breastfeeding advocacy efforts to affect policy changes, increase investment in breastfeeding programmes and improve quality of care and support to mothers, and describe challenges encountered.
  4. Encourage action in countries to improve breastfeeding policies and programmes as per the Global Breastfeeding Collective Call to Action based on the lessons learned.

To RSVP to the Webinars please see the links below:

January 30 (Wednesday)
• Webinar 1 (English): Asia 10:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. (CET) >  http://bit.ly/breastfeeding2019rsvp1
• Webinar 2 (English): Africa 12:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. (CET) >  http://bit.ly/breastfeeding2019rsvp2
 
January 31 (Thursday)
• Webinar 3 (Français): Africa 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. (CET) >  http://bit.ly/breastfeeding2019rsvp4
• Webinar 4 (Español): Latin America 5:00 p.m. – 6:30 p.m. (CET) >  http://bit.ly/breastfeeding2019rsvp3

Transforming the food system to fight non-communicable diseases

Malnutrition and unhealthy diets are important risk factors for non-communicable diseases. Francesco Branca and colleagues call for changes in both what and how food is produced, marketed, and consumed in their latest articleTransforming the food system to fight non-communicable diseases.

Key messages

  • Poor quality diets, malnutrition in all its forms, and NCDs are closely linked. Unhealthy diets are now the biggest risk factor for NCDs
  • Poor quality diets, malnutrition, and NCDs are the logical consequences of, among other factors, major changes to how food is produced, sold, marketed, and consumed around the world in the past half century
  • Transformation of current food systems to improve availability, affordability, and uptake of nutritious, safe, affordable, and sustainable diets is key to tackling malnutrition in all its forms and diet related NCDs
  • Policy options to tackle the different forms of malnutrition and diet related NCDs can also help create food systems that are sustainable, benefitting planetary health
  • The United Nations Decade of Action on Nutrition, along with the 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda and Goals, are a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to simultaneously and cost effectively improve diets, eliminate malnutrition, reduce death and disability from NCDs, and promote sustainable development

Download the full article here.

The Global Syndemic of Obesity, Undernutrition, and Climate Change: The Lancet Commission report

Malnutrition in all its forms, including obesity, undernutrition, and other dietary risks, is the leading cause of poor health globally. In the near future, the health effects of climate change will considerably compound these health challenges. Climate change can be considered a pandemic because of its sweeping effects on the health of humans and the natural systems we depend on (ie, planetary health). These three pandemics—obesity, undernutrition, and climate change—represent The Global Syndemic that affects most people in every country and region worldwide. They constitute a syndemic, or synergy of epidemics, because they co-occur in time and place, interact with each other to produce complex sequelae, and share common underlying societal drivers.

This Commission recommends comprehensive actions to address obesity within the context of The Global Syndemic, which represents the paramount health challenge for humans, the environment, and our planet in the 21st century.

To access The Global Syndemic of Obesity, Undernutrition, and Climate Change Hub page at The Lancet, click here. For the full report, click here. 

IAEA’s Nutritional and Health-Related Environmental Studies Newsletter – January 2019 edition

The 9th Nutritional & Health-related Environmental Studies Newsletter features the following articles.

Meeting outcomes

  • International Symposium on Understanding the Double Burden of Malnutrition for Effective Interventions
  • Stable isotopes and the double burdens of disease and malnutrition: reflections from the 8th African Nutritional Epidemiology Conference
  • 62nd IAEA General Conference: Botswana shares results on body composition and anaemia among children living in malaria prone-areas
  • Interregional project (INT/6/058) using stable isotopes to improve the evidence base for stunting reduction programmes worldwide

New publications

  • IAEA Brief: Stable Isotope Techniques Help to Address the Double Burden of Malnutrition
  • IAEA Video: Improving Health with Atomic Precision in Mauritius
  • IAEA Doubly Labelled Water Database
  • Assessment of Zinc Metabolism in Humans Using Stable Zinc Isotope Techniques
  • Body mass index vs deuterium dilution method in African children
  • IAEA’s role in fighting micronutrient malnutrition

Success stories

  • A nuclear technique helps Seychelles to identify key drivers of overweight and obesity in school children

This edition also features a NAHRES Special article entitled The future of food systems by the UNSCN.

You can download you copy here.

IAEA Brief: Stable Isotope Techniques Help to Address the Double Burden of Malnutrition

To be in good health, individuals require nutritious food, high-quality water, physical activity, adequate sleep, and a living environment devoid of germs and toxic contaminants. An imbalance in any of these factors may manifest in one or more forms of malnutrition including being undernourished or becoming overweight or obese. 

The term double burden of malnutrition (DBM) connotes a situation where at least two or more forms of malnutrition coexist at individual, household, or national levels and at different points in an individual’s life. The IAEA supports countries in applying stable isotope techniques to assess key indicators associated with the DBM and to evaluate the impact of corrective actions to address it, thereby contributing to evidence-based policy formulation.

To learn more about their work, and to download your copy of the IAEA Brief: Stable Isotope Techniques Help to Address the Double Burden of Malnutrition, visit here.

 

Call for experiences in the use and application of three sets of CFS policy recommendations on smallholder agriculture in the context of food security and nutrition

A stocktaking event is planned to be held in October 2019 during CFS 46 Plenary Session of the Committee on World Food Security (CFS) to monitor the use and application of the following CFS policy recommendations:

Set 1: Investing in Smallholder Agriculture for Food Security and Nutrition (endorsed in 2013)

Set 2: Connecting Smallholders to Markets (endorsed in 2016)

Set 3: Sustainable Agricultural Development for Food Security and Nutrition: What Roles for Livestock?
            (endorsed in 2016)

The Committee on World Food Security requests stakeholders to provide inputs on their experiences in applying any of these policy recommendations by 22 April 2019 to inform the CFS 46 event.

These policy recommendations are of great relevance to all CFS stakeholders, and particularly to the smallholder producers who are the main contributors to food security and nutrition and the most numerous category of family farmers. They are key protagonists of the United Nations Decade on Family Farming and this stocktaking event at CFS 46 will constitute a specific contribution of CFS to the Decade in 2019.

The event will focus on how smallholders have effectively benefitted or are expected to benefit from these CFS policy recommendations. It will also look into the potential application of CFS policy outcomes, especially for the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and in the context of the UN Decade on Family Farming and the UN Decade of Action on Nutrition. Given the important role of women in the context of smallholder agriculture, the event will also contribute to mainstreaming the messages of the 2017 CFS Forum on Women’s Empowerment in the Context of Food Security and Nutrition.

All inputs received will contribute to monitoring progress on the use and application of the three sets of CFS policy recommendations. All inputs will be compiled in a document made available for delegates at CFS 46 in October 2019.

Please use the template available here for sharing your experience in applying any of these policy recommendations. You can upload the completed form below or send it via email to fsn-moderator@fao.org. The deadline for submissions is 22 April 2019.

Submissions can be made in any of the UN languages (Arabic, Chinese, English, French, Russian and Spanish) and should be strictly limited to 1,000 words.

Nutrition Exchange – Issue 11/ January 2019

Issue 11 of Nutrition Exchange features some common themes of networks and coordination for nutrition, including a short article on the commitments made by Brazil, Ecuador and Italy under the UN Decade of Action on Nutrition (available at pages 28-29).

Nutrition Exchange is an ENN publication that contains short, non-technical and easy-to-read articles on nutrition programme experiences and learning, from countries with a high burden of undernutrition and those that are prone to crisis. It also summarises research and provides information on guidance, tools and upcoming trainings in nutrition and related sectors. It is published twice per year and one issue is dedicated to Scaling Up Nutrition (SUN) Movement related learning and experiences of scale up which is facilitated by the ENN SUN Knowledge Management Project regional and Global team.  

NEX is available in English, French, Arabic and Spanish.